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Unofficial technical weapon question forum.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Scythe, Jan 26, 2002.

  1. OICW

    OICW Reason & Logic > Religion

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    Ummm, yes. Why wouldn't it?

    Stopping power is a myth. The idea that you can say "Okay, this round will stop someone 80% of the time if you shoot them in the torso" is deeply flawed; there's a lot of variables to consider with gunshot wounds.

    The bullet velocity, construction, calibre, shot placement, angle, depth of tissue it passes through, the person's clothing all influence the severity of the wound.

    Bullets create two things when they pass through tissue; a temporary cavity and a permanent cavity. The temporary cavity is a temporary inflation of the surrounding tissues caused by the bullet's passage, as most tissue is elastic. The temporary cavity by itself causes very little to no damage to most elastic tissues, like blood vessels, however, it can cause a rupture of fluid filled organs like the liver or brain.

    The permanent cavity is the actual physical hole caused by the bullet

    Read these articles for more information;

    http://home.snafu.de/l.moeller/milit..._patterns.html

    http://www.firearmstactical.com/hwfe.htm

    http://teapot.usask.ca/cdn-firearms/Fackler/wrong.html
     
  2. Buddz

    Buddz New Member

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    So it's not like the projectile actually rises up, or so, but it's more like the barrel is pointed upwards a bit and so the projectile is fired upwards too... did I get that right?
     
  3. geogob

    geogob Koohii o nomimasu ka?

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    Not really a weapon question.... but somewhat.

    When you fire a rifle while using a night vision device, do you get momentarely blinded by the muzzle flash? (NV saturation).

    Are some weapon design less sensitive to NV blinding?
     
  4. BTH

    BTH Dickcheese Faggot

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    according to a former special ops i know, you get temporarly blinded by the muzzle flashes at night without nightvision. About half to one second if it's very dark. He fired with G3's an Z-70's (Uzi copy). Moreover, you get temporarly blinded by the brightness of your own red dot sight when it's very dark
     
  5. geogob

    geogob Koohii o nomimasu ka?

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    and how about *with* nightvision :p

    But that's interesting, although pretty logicial
     
  6. 5eleven

    5eleven I don't give a f**k, call the Chaplain

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    Yes. We just did some additional range training engaging targets with pistols wearing AN-PVS7 Gen III night vision. It bleaches, affects focus, and it really depends on distance to target. It has been my experience that night vision affects depth perception, and items very close to you are difficult to determine distance, in addition to being completely out of focus. This obviously affects shooting, especially CQB or close targets. It also severely limits your ability to locate items on your person, because it's like having binoculars glued to your head. You can't easily glance down, which makes things like reloads difficult IF you don't train enough to know where everything is and how it works. A malfunction would be a real pain in the keyster.

    Plain and simple - It ain't easy.
     
  7. geogob

    geogob Koohii o nomimasu ka?

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    Thank you for the information 5-11.

    I was asking because the question came out with Neabit yesterday while beta testing the Night vision mutator.
     
  8. cracwhore

    cracwhore I'm a video game review site...

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    Hate to derail this thread any more, but...

    Red dot sights are adjusted to be less luminous during the night. So, at night, you won't be blinded, as the I.R. Sensor knows to adjust the brightness of the projection.

    Myth: Busted!
     
  9. geogob

    geogob Koohii o nomimasu ka?

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    Is that adjustement always automatic? if not and your dumb enough not do adjust it correctly, you'll still get blinded by the brightness of the aimpoint ;)
     
  10. 5eleven

    5eleven I don't give a f**k, call the Chaplain

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    Crac, I assume you are talking about something like the Eotech Holosite - the 551 or whatever it is - that is NV compatible? A regular, normal, run of the mill red dot won't do that, only one that is nightvision compatible. Which is all really really nice, but muzzleflash ain't compatible. It does temporarily bleach out the nightvision device until it recompensates.

    EDIT
    Recompensate - is that even a word?

    I didn't see above that the other fella was talking about red dots. Nonetheless, what I said above is true. I've got a couple of red-dotters that have manual adjustability for reticle brightness, no auto adjustment. I would think you would want one designed to work with NV.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2006
  11. cracwhore

    cracwhore I'm a video game review site...

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    Right, it would have to be a NV compatible device in order for you to see the dot while wearing NVG's. I was talking about just using the red-dots at night without NVG's. Soldiers adjust their sights to be more luminous during the day so that they can see the dot. They turn it down at night so that the dot doesn't saturate their vision.

    I thought it would be worth mentioning that many of the nice (i.e. costly) sights have auto-adjustment via sensory technology that will automatically adjust the luminosity of the sight, according to conditions. There are manual controls on most as well.




    edit: correction
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2006
  12. keihaswarrior

    keihaswarrior New Member

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    It is automatic for the Trijicon Reflex (the one on the M4A1 and M16A4). For the others (ADOG, EoTech, etc) I think it is safe to assume that the soldier IS smart enough to adjust the brightness of his optics to suit his environment or use of NV. ;)
     
  13. BTH

    BTH Dickcheese Faggot

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    @Crack: Try it in extreme darkness with no light and no moon, the reddot adjusted at '1' will not blind you, but you will see the blurr around it too big to see the target you're aiming at

    @FiveEleven: I thought all that was GenIII nightvision devices were designed to overcome
     
  14. ravens_hawk

    ravens_hawk New Member

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    On the topics of NVGs, I heard once that with newer NVGs moving from darkness to lit areas wouldn't over saturate. So while you'd still be tempoarily blinded it'd be no (or not much) worse than walking from dark into light normally.
     
  15. 5eleven

    5eleven I don't give a f**k, call the Chaplain

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    It was my experience in the military with AN-PVS5's, and now with AN-PVS7's, that they are all pretty much the same. Although the 7's seem to be clearer and light amplification and depth perception is improved, I'm just telling you, that working close with either of these is tricky. Using these on either a head harness or helmet mount, you can only move them so close to your eyes. In a pitch black indoor range, I almost had to use the IR illuminator on the goggles. Remember, we are also using them for qualification. I have never used them with NV compatible optics, but I can tell you that when you set your focus on the goggles to something at slight distance, almost like binoculars, everything close (irons) is "fuzzy" or out of focus. I will also tell you that with pistols, I noticed two things: Non-illuminating sights are almost impossible to see or discern, while tritium sights are almost too bright and completely out of focus. Nonetheless, that isn't as much of a problem as quick followup shots are after muzzle flash. I'm telling you, your field of vision gets bleached out pretty quick. I haven't had much of an opportunity to do live-fire with a long gun with them on, but when the weather gets nicer, we're going to do some training with both the MP5's and the M4's. I'm particularly interested in firing it with the MP5-SD's. I'll let you know.
     
  16. ravens_hawk

    ravens_hawk New Member

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    Ok I did some quick research about NVGs. It seems the latest generation (4) uses gated power supplies, which allow for quick adjustment from light to darkness and vice versa. However current military technology uses generation 3 which lacks the "gated" technology. And hence can be easily blinded by bright lights.
     
  17. geogob

    geogob Koohii o nomimasu ka?

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    What kind of amplification system is used by the gen 4? I heared of combined Gen III and thermal imagine in one single device, but not of Gen IV.
     
  18. Buddz

    Buddz New Member

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    Is there a specific reason why there are no Fullsize MG in Bull-up configuration? Is it too uneasy to carry and fire to have the belt box so near?
     
  19. mat69

    mat69 just fooling around

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    Uhm.
    I think it is the space the box or the belt needs. How should you fire the weapon if you can not aim (comfortable) it because the box is in the way?
    Barrel changing would be uncomfortable ...
    Bullpup weapons like the Steyr AUG used as LMG use larger magazines, but no cmags, boxes ...
    I do not see any advantages.
     
  20. Snakeye

    Snakeye Mk82HD

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    In a recent conversation on the COOP server the topic of the SIG 550 rifle was raised and it's reliability (jams and the like) was questioned. Since I, until now, was under the impression the SIG550 series was a reliable weapon (I mean, it's action is basically taken from the AK74, if I understood correctly) I did a bit more of research. Unfortunately the sources are pretty disagreeing. Some claim a SIG550 will show a rising probabilty to jam after 1000rds if not cleaned while others stated it was a reliable rifle.

    Anyone got (more) detailed info and/or first hand experience? If there are frequent jams what are they attributed to (e.g. ammo used, magazine design, system design)?

    Thanks in advance..
     

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