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I'm a beginner to Ubuntu.

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by dotnetbeast, Feb 20, 2015.

  1. dotnetbeast

    dotnetbeast Mood Muzik

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    Just needed some tips.
    Can you game in this?

    I have both the 32 bit ISO and the 64 bit ISO, for those who have tips on installing this in VMware. (first time using that as well.)

    Thanks in advance.
     
  2. cryptophreak

    cryptophreak unbalanced

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    You can run games built for Linux.

    VMware is a shitty way to game though. You’ll eat up system resources by running the host operating system and the virtual machine simultaneously.
     
  3. dotnetbeast

    dotnetbeast Mood Muzik

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    Well....other than running games?
    I (at the moment) cannot install on a separate drive.
     
  4. cryptophreak

    cryptophreak unbalanced

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    Then repartition your drive and dual-boot.

    What are you hoping to do?
     
  5. dotnetbeast

    dotnetbeast Mood Muzik

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    Learn a new OS. Ubuntu seemed like the option.
     
  6. cryptophreak

    cryptophreak unbalanced

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    So you want to play with Linux for the sake of pure technological entertainment? A worthy goal, sir. You'll find that everything is malleable and the terminal is your friend. I picked things up gradually over the years, but this was just posted on Hacker News and looks to be a cool guide:

    http://www.oliverelliott.org/article/computing/tut_unix/
     
  7. IronMonkey

    IronMonkey Moi?

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    If you end up trying to get the Linux UT installers running on Ubuntu, I've squirrelled away some of the missing dependencies here: http://www.margrave.myzen.co.uk/InstallUTonLinux.html (let me know if there are any new things missing as I don't routinely use Ubuntu).

    I assume by VMWare, you mean VMWare Server? I used to use that but I ended up going with VirtualBox for the better 3D implementation (I got UnrealED running on Linux by running it on XP in VirtualBox). VirtualBox with the Oracle extensions is worth looking at if you have a Windows host.
     
  8. DarkED

    DarkED The Great Oppression

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    Welcome to Linux! As you'll no doubt discover, Linux on the desktop has become a fine replacement for Windows or OS X. It is also a fantastic option for custom HTPCs with it's low system requirements and energy usage; I am running XBMCbuntu on on one that is running very dated hardware (Core 2 Duo E4500, 1GB RAM, Intel Extreme graphics) and it has no problems running most emulators and playing 1080p content.

    For what it's worth, I can't recommend the main Ubuntu release these days. It's bloated and slow, and the default interface (Unity) has devolved into a real shitfest. If I were you I'd start with a distro that features a more traditional (and more usable) interface, like Xubuntu, any version of Mint, or Elementary OS. Unity is likely going to be an exercise in frustration.

    Also worth mentioning is that you do not need 64-bit if you have more than 4GB of RAM; that is a Windows limitation. The 32-bit Linux PAE kernel (included by default with most modern distros) can access and use insane amounts of RAM. In fact, it is generally recommended for most people to stick with a 32-bit install - with Linux, 32-bit is much easier to manage (because you don't need to deal with ia32lib dependencies) as well as being better supported. 32-bit also tends to perform marginally better because it does not use more resources unnecessarily.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2015
  9. dotnetbeast

    dotnetbeast Mood Muzik

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    I will defiinitely check out this guide when I get home. I'll keep you posted. Thanks bro.

    Hmm. I forgot about XBMC. I still have that on my modded Xbox....somewhere in the house.
    Funny thing is the one I installed is the main Ubuntu release. I did think it was slow.

    I have VMWare player (broke as a joke) and also VirtualBox, so it looks like using VirtualBox would be better. Thanks for the suggestion.
    ======================================
    Question. Is there a better Linux installation that I should be using?
     
  10. cryptophreak

    cryptophreak unbalanced

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    So Linux itself is sort of a starting point for an OS, and Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, Mint, etc. are distributions which aim to take that starting point, bundle it with some other software that most people take for granted in 2015 (window managers, Web browsers, etc.) and provide a nice, easy installation process. Different people will select different distros depending on their desires/needs.

    For people looking to dig into the innards of their computer, see how everything fits together, and customize the shit out of everything that most people don’t think about, there are distros like Arch and Slack. These are not easy to install and configure. They require comfort with the command line, an understanding of the way your hard drive works with its different partitions and so forth, and a bunch of UNIX-specific understanding. Not really recommended for beginners, but fun and interesting for advanced users.

    If you’re looking to have a functioning system out of the box, Ubuntu is a great option, as are its derivative alternatives like Kubuntu (http://www.kubuntu.org/getkubuntu, a version of Ubuntu with the KDE desktop manager instead of Unity) or Xubuntu (http://xubuntu.org/, a version with Xfce). Linux Mint with the standard Cinnamon desktop manager (http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2714) is frequently cited as a really easy distro for transitioning from Windows, specifically.

    Since you have an interest in gaming, Steam has a bunch of games for Linux and IIRC assumes Ubuntu; other distros my or may not work, try at your own risk. Valve likely made this decision because Ubuntu is far and away the most popular distro out there.

    If you choose to go with Ubuntu, I would recommend going with one of the alternate flavors like Xubuntu because, like Dark said, Unity is widely regarded as kind of shitty. Last I checked, it also functions as Amazon spy/adware out of the box—searching your system will pull up Amazon results in addition to your local files, which means Amazon can see what you’re doing in your file system. This kind of thing isn’t typically tolerated in FOSS circles and I’m amazed that Canonical is getting away with it, but there you have it.
     
  11. DarkED

    DarkED The Great Oppression

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    Yep. Linux distros just cut down the amount of work needed to get a functional system up and running. You can even build an entire system from scratch, but I wouldn't recommend it even with an advanced level of knowledge; it's more an exercise in frustration than anything else and there's not much performance to be gained by doing it.

    You can also use base-system or net-install images to 'build' your own system using that distro's package manager. This is a good way to have a system with only the stuff you need and nothing you don't. I build my servers this way using Ubuntu's base (Ubuntu's base system actually is pretty good.)

    I'm fairly certain Canonical got rid of the Amazon crapware built into Unity in a previous release, but I can't honestly remember. Still, the point is that if you absolutely must use Ubuntu, at least go with Xubuntu (XFCE) or Lubuntu (LXDE) which are still fairly sluggish for no good reason on older hardware. If you want to use a GNOME or KDE desktop, there are far better distros (Mint) that ship with them.
     
  12. Sir_Brizz

    Sir_Brizz Administrator Staff Member

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    The reason I still use Kubuntu over something like Mint KDE is simply the freshness factor. Since Mint bases from Ubuntu, you don't get updates until many months after they have been out. It is already hard enough sometimes with mainline Kubuntu. :)

    I got over Gnome a long time ago and Unity isn't an improvement over Gnome at all. Also, KDE's version 5 platforms and software are pretty nice so I'll stick around that for a while. I really liked KDE4 in the end as well.
     
  13. DarkED

    DarkED The Great Oppression

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    Mint based on Ubuntu XX.YY will receive the same updates Ubuntu XX.YY does at (mostly) the same time. Open up sources.list on any Ubuntu-based Mint release and you'll see the following:
    Code:
    mint@mint ~ $ inxi -r
    Repos:     Active apt sources in file: /etc/apt/sources.list
               deb cdrom:[Linux Mint 17 _Qiana_ - Release i386 20140513]/ trusty contrib main non-free
               Active apt sources in file: /etc/apt/sources.list.d/official-package-repositories.list
               deb http://packages.linuxmint.com qiana main upstream import #id:linuxmint_main
               deb http://extra.linuxmint.com qiana main #id:linuxmint_extra
               deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu trusty main restricted universe multiverse
               deb http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu trusty-updates main restricted universe multiverse
               deb http://security.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ trusty-security main restricted universe multiverse
               deb http://archive.canonical.com/ubuntu/ trusty partner
    mint@mint ~ $ uname -a
    Linux mint 3.13.0-24-generic #46-Ubuntu SMP Thu Apr 10 19:08:14 UTC 2014 i686 i686 i686 GNU/Linux
    They both share Ubuntu's repos for the main system, packages.linuxmint is just a small repo with Mint-specific packages and configs rolled-in :D

    The specifics in this case are MATE/Cinnamon and the Mint artwork packages, but even those packages are available to Ubuntu via repos. All the rest is Ubuntu with tweaked configs. This also includes KDE and XFCE, as those are mostly stock aside from config tweaks and Mint's menu and artwork.
     
    Last edited: Feb 23, 2015
  14. Sir_Brizz

    Sir_Brizz Administrator Staff Member

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    Well with Mint it's more about the initial time it takes them to cut a new build. They do make several changes for stability and user experience.
     
  15. dotnetbeast

    dotnetbeast Mood Muzik

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    I'm in class right now downloading Xubuntu to try in VirtualBox. Once it's installed, what's the first thing I should do once it's installed?


    EDIT:: School is watching the bandwidth. Download stops after 400 megs. Tried it four times.
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2015
  16. cryptophreak

    cryptophreak unbalanced

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    Definitely this:



    If that looks too advanced, just look around for a minute to get a feel for the GUI, use the browser, etc. Then open a terminal emulator (Super+T, also known as Windows Key+T) and poke around the file system. Use the cd command to change directories (e.g. cd / to go to the top-level directory) and ls to list the contents of a directory. To read the contents of a text file, use less (e.g. less my-cool-text-doc.txt). Check out this page for an overview of what you should expect to be where on a Linux machine: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Filesystem_Hierarchy_Standard

    Try creating and editing files. Do cd / to go to the top-level directory, then create a folder to play in: mkdir lolMyTestThing. Use cd to enter the folder. (You don’t have to type the full cd lolMyTestThing, you can use the Tab key to autocomplete; type cd lol and hit Tab, and the rest of the directory name should be filled in for you.) Make a file with the touch command, as in touch leet-text-file.txt. Read it with less like we did a minute ago; obviously there's nothing inside the file because you’ve not written anything. Fix that by editing the file with nano; nano leet-text-file.txt. Remember Tab for autocomplete when typing the file name. nano is easier to learn than more powerful editors like vim because the shortcuts for exiting and so forth are displayed at the bottom of the screen, but I do recommend upgrading to vim if you want to do development work in a UNIX environment like the cool kids.

    Congrats, you basically know where stuff is in the file system and how to create and edit files. Where do you want to go from there? You can install new software with your package manager, start cloning repos from Github and hacking the Pentagon, etc.
     

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