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Linux Games

Discussion in 'Games' started by inferyes, Jul 26, 2011.

  1. SleepyHe4d

    SleepyHe4d fap fap fap

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    I didn't say they didn't boot in roughly the same amount of time. That's right, and there's nothing wrong with that. All OS's have to load up similar stuff in similar ways and have similar boot times. Big effin deal. I hardly have to reboot any of my systems anyways.

    Here's a google'd comparison for you: http://www.phoronix.com/scan.php?page=article&item=linux_windows_part1&num=1
    tl;dr read the first and last page.

    It's free. Okay. :hmm:

    Sure, casual people can use Linux fine cause all they stuff they need is already installed in most cases. Yay, Facebook! If you want to do other more advanced stuff you have to mess with command lines, packages and all that annoying crap.

    inb4 "ur a noob its easy to learn"

    Well I don't want to fuck with having to apt-get like 10 different things and get certain libs to get stuff to work when I can just use a binary installer or program in Windows just fine in 2 clicks.

    Yeah, maybe certain software that was written specifically for Linux. Have fun messing with hardware/driver incompatibilities though and having to use 3rd party drivers or not having certain things work at all like a Wifi adapter.
     
  2. inferyes

    inferyes Spaced In

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    > Unbuntu

    No. Just no.

    And drivers? Try getting drivers for windows XP from 1st party computer manufacturers like Dell and HP. They don't even exist most of the time.

    At least with linux you can actually get 3rd party drivers. If windows decides to stop supporting something it's pretty much done for.
     
  3. Jacks:Revenge

    Jacks:Revenge ╠╣E╚╚O

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    oh no.
    I didn't mean to start a debate.

    all I wanted to know is whether or not going Linux really benefits anyone that isn't worried about advanced software configuration. or someone who doesn't really have any problems with Windows OS.
     
  4. SleepyHe4d

    SleepyHe4d fap fap fap

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    Meh, doesn't matter. That's what discussion boards are for. ;)

    Nah, I think we can all agree on that. Unless these two come up with some huge deal that makes it a must to switch over. Anyways it's just a matter of opinion, and if you have no problems with Windows, why bother?

    Still though, it's easy to install some distro on a cd and just run it off of that and give it a go. Just do it anyways cause it's easy and I'd like to hear your opinion on whatever distro. inferyes seems to hold Fedora 15 on gods pedestal. :p
     
  5. Sir_Brizz

    Sir_Brizz Administrator Staff Member

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    Call me stupid, but I don't see how this does anything for you or me...
    You never have to apt-get anything. There is this fancy tool (that has always existed, by the way) called Software Center (or something similar) that lets you download packages by searching a name. And, surprise surprise! it also determines dependencies for you so you aren't downloading stupid libraries. Has it been 10 years since you even tried using Linux or something?
    What are you talking about? I have less driver issues in Linux than I do in Windows. And 99% of the drivers install with the initial install and I never have to go hunt them down.
     
  6. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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    This. Since there are LiveCDs for every distribution out there, trying it out is easy - just download the image and either burn to a CD or, if you are modern and don't want to use CDs, write the image on a USB drive. LiveCDs are run directly off the CD and allow you to use the OS as if it was installed on the physical disk, with the exception that anything you do will not be saved (hence it's a great way to experiment). If you use LiveUSBs, then settings can in fact be saved, which makes it essentially a Linux in your pocket, even if struggling with disk space.

    Oh yea, and there are basically no viruses for Linux. Sure, there were some developed, but kernel patches and the fact that you need the root password for serious changes keeps all of that in line. In Windows, I have to use a firewall and an anti-virus, while here I don't need to use anything at all, the integrated firewall (and the router) takes care of everything.

    Indeed. The package managers are called a variety of names - Synaptic, YaST, Smart etc., but they all do the same thing - solve dependencies. You install a program, it will automatically pull in all its requirements.

    With the drivers, it's two-fold. For one, Linux has a history of having drivers preinstalled, so the OS just works. I remember how I had to battle Windows for the installation of network card drivers, and failed in the end anyway (since you can't do much there without internet to begin with), while after booting to Linux, internet just worked, instantly. Same thing with many other pieces of hardware - sound card, wifi card, printer etc. They just work on Linux. However, some of the hardware can be limited, for example, my sound card has hardware support for EAX presets, but the lack of drivers on Creative part makes that feature unusable here. Still, those are just additional features, the core functionality is there.

    Also, no, Radeon HD 5xxx support is there and is stable, at least with the binary blob. The open-source stack is not as well-developed, but that's to be expected.

    And about the performance - the benchmarks are conducted with fresh installations of both OSs. In that case yes, their performance is similar. But in practise, long periods of usage will make Windows sluggish, while Linux is relatively immune to that. Plus, like I said, you need a whole lot of other programs to make Windows usable, while all those tools are already integrated into Linux.

    About the command line, it's actually very, very useful. I often times find myself preferring it to GUIs. That's because certain tasks, like deleting files or searching through text files, is a whole lot faster in the command line. When I get back to Windows, I often find myself limited by the Windows Command prompt (can you imagine that, it has no grep or less! :p )
     
  7. Godfrey.Payans

    Godfrey.Payans Member

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    I've got no problems with Windows, and dual boot both, but I only use Windows (7) for games. For everything else on the PC, I use Linux, mainly because of the powerful shell and the free software, but also cosmetically for multiple workspaces and free eye-candy. And I guess Linux feels safer; web browsing seems safer, and I trust that I'll have more recourse to recover a damaged file system in Linux than I will in Windows.

    Generally speaking though, I'd have thought that the main pluses for each OS are games and commercial software for Windows, and free software and less security hassle (no virus checker always slowing stuff down, nothing like SecuROM and friends, etc.) for Linux.
     
  8. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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  9. DeusIX

    DeusIX Engineer

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    There's an obvious troll in this thread

    Why would anyone with a working windows even considers using Linux?
    - Tech aspect
    If one is interested in technology. It's very easy to find out what the fuzz is all about. Boot from a live CD and see.
    - Economical aspect
    No more forced upgrades! I gave my dad my old machine (dual boot: w2k & ubuntu). Ubuntu is used for work and windows when the kids play.


    I have used Ubuntu for few years now and I like it.
    pros:
    - Economical! I really don't want to spend money on hardware if the existing still works. Linux gave these old machines few extra years :).
    - It just works! (with proper drivers). If I have a device that has drivers they are all auto-installed. Now compare this to ms approach where I have to hunt the latest drivers from the manufacturers website and reboot...
    - Wine. For some reason wine performs faster on some scenarios under Linux. This is behaviour that I don't understand, but I don't mind.
    - Boot time (and speed in general).
    - Networking (this is more technical that most ppl here needs).

    cons:
    - There are devices that simply doesn't have drivers (my gamepad & printer).
    - Poor drivers (gfx-card).
    -> Basically, for me the only con are bad/missing hardware drivers.
    - Games (only applies if you play only modern games).
    - It doesn't work! If you have a device with no drivers I doesn't work. These devices are usually exotic devices.


    What do I miss from windows?
    - Games (some emulators).
    >I don't play as much as I did so that is not an issue and when I do I can always boot. And after theh 15 min that it takes for my vista to start I can play gaems! :D
    - My precious gamepad.
    This annoys me a lot. I can't even play Megaman with my linux! :mad:
    - OS-tans
    :rolleyes:
    - Foobar2000
    Works though wine though :lol:
     
  10. Bi()ha2arD

    Bi()ha2arD Toxic!

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    If what you currently have works for you then imo don't switch.
     
  11. inferyes

    inferyes Spaced In

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    I got gentoo. :lol:
     
  12. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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    Whatever I try, I always get openSUSE, Fedora and Mandriva. Which probably is because of RPM/KDE choice. I tried Fedora and Kubuntu, but the former is too limited with its package management and the latter uses debs, so I stick with openSUSE and its awesome YaST.
     
  13. Sir_Brizz

    Sir_Brizz Administrator Staff Member

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    openSUSE was great when it was in active development. I haven't tried Tumbleweed so maybe life is better there, but their releases right now are WAY too sparse so massive improvements in performance and quality take forever to get in.

    I definitely prefer Kubuntu, just because it is easy to install and manage. Doesn't require a ton of time or effort. There is nothing wrong with debs. Also has the advantage of being almost unilaterally supported by application develolpers.

    I like Arch but it requires too much time commitment to get it setup. I'm thinking of trying something like Sabayon just to see if I can get interested in Gentoo, but it's probably not likely.

    But, KDE all the way. Screw Gnome, and, particularly, screw Unity. What a horrible UI.
     
  14. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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    Well, they have plenty of repositories for updates. So you can upgrade whenever you feel like it. Except for things like Amarok Beta, I can't find it anywhere yet. As for Tumbleweed, they don't support things like binary graphics blobs, so for me it's a no-go.

    Yea, there is nothing wrong with debs, but I started out with rpms. And I really like the Open Build Service, where you can find basically any existing programs precompiled for you. While it is available for other distros as well, it's still centred around openSUSE. And overall I find it easier to find RPMs than DEBs on the net.

    Yea, I also didn't like Gnome too much. Not that I used it a whole lot, though. Basically I prefer KDE for a full-featured desktop, or Xfce for lightweight.
     
  15. IronMonkey

    IronMonkey Moi?

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    +1

    (Well, maybe not screw them; I wish them well and they're free to go to hell in their own way but Gnome (V2 or [especially] V3) is just a horrible user experience.)
     
  16. Hadmar

    Hadmar Queen Bitch of the Universe

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    If you are not interested in Linux for ideological reasons or simply because you are generally interested in technology and you have no problems with Windows, use it long enough to know your way around and don't mind the higher security risk (Linux is simply not the primary target for malware) and that you technically have to pay for it then there's no reason for you to switch.


    One question has these answers:
    I prefer to use perfectly stable, thoroughly tested software
    I want to have the latest and greatest stable software
    I don't mind testing new, exciting, but experimental stuff

    I picked the middle answer and in the end got Debian as 100% match. I don't quite understand that. Last time I used Debian you had the choice between the first answer (standard Debian) or the last (by switching to testing or experimental).
     
  17. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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    Did you get anything else as 100%? Since I'm pretty sure it shows at least one distro as 100% all the time. But yea, Debian is the perfectly stable kind of distro.
     
  18. Hadmar

    Hadmar Queen Bitch of the Universe

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    Yep, IIRC I got Fedora, Kubuntu, Debian and OpenSUSE as 100%. Maybe one more.
     
  19. GreatEmerald

    GreatEmerald Khnumhotep

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    Oh, then that's definitely odd.
     
  20. inferyes

    inferyes Spaced In

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    Finally got FFMPEG and stuff working. I can record games on linux now :D

    [M]http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=z2WnyreJrX8[/M]

    Quality is not so good but I'm working on it.
     

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