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"Hello my name is Dell and I suck."

Discussion in 'Off Topic' started by Kibbles-N-Bits, Oct 16, 2003.

  1. Nightmare

    Nightmare Only human

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    As long as you don't try mixing stuff it's fine. Buy a Dell, keep it that way. Build yourself, it's fine too. Then there are people who think they can improve the Dell... I read some posts on Corsair's help forum, and the stupidity of man is still enough to surprise me. There was one guy who was angry with Corsair because he had bought their PC3200 memory and added it to his Dell, and it only ran at 333mhz. Reason? The Dell couldn't run both the Corsair and the old memory at 400mhz, it dropped to 333. The Corsair didn't agree with running at CL3, and that was all the old RAM could handle at 400mhz. So it dropped both to 333 and CL 2.5.

    Why would anyone add 1gb of Corsair RAM to a Dell and keep the cheaper 512mb PC3200 memory? Why?
     
  2. Vega-don

    Vega-don arreté pour detention de tomate prohibée

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    companies or administrations who need computers save money by purchasing dells computer , they have everything already set up , full support ,3 years garantee(?)... they dont need to worry about their computers.
    thats why most companies own dell computers or similar computers.
    you don't see the boss buying 100 cheaps harddrives , then 100 cheaps screens.... then seting up 100 computers. that would be a waste of money
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2003
  3. Thrash123

    Thrash123 Obey Leash Laws

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    Exactly vega-don. I work for computer services here at my college, and we just outfitted most of the campus will Dell machines. However, we wipe and reload them with our own configurations (and some proprietary software).

    The only problem we have really had so far is trying to get a business desktop machine to accept a Pinnacle ProONE RTDV card, but that's mostly because the machines weren't configured to do video work like that. We'll see what happens, though. Otherwise, I love the cases - and Dell actually does cable management, and a decent job of it. If I had to build all the new machines across campus I would get VERY sick and tired of the cable management - plus the warranty saves the college money. We had a GFX card go and they just sent us a new one, with the only cost being us shipping the old one back. Some independant hardware RMA groups really could learn something from that :)
     
  4. GNAT

    GNAT ...

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    yeah we have about 5000pcs here and i'd say 4000 of which are dell. We have overnight turn around on parts, its great. Order a part and it will either be there that afternoon or bright and early the next day. Can't beat it.
     
  5. SaraP

    SaraP New Member

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    I generally recommend Dell for mainstream/business and Alienware for power-users (although most serious power-users will of course prefer to build their own systems instead).
     
  6. phatcat

    phatcat akward cat

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    I like dell. My first real game rig was a Dell back in 1998. It was the most dependable PC I had ever used. For what you get in a dell its all pretty standard stuff and at a decent price. Sure you can go buy all the parts and put them together, but with a dell its all there, done and ready to go.
    Serious Just look at Beer, have you seen how many posts he had made about problems with his PC? If you look back you can even see a few of mine. Sure it pays off in the end wallet wise, but some people don't go for that Tinker till it works kinna thing.

    As for the 64-bit issue. I'm going to have to agree. Sure the prospect of moving to 64 looks nice, but the hassel of emmulation and compadablity is just a headache. I think we are close however. I fear that AMD jumped the gun on this one. Not that their product is good, its just no one is there to buy it right now.

    kinna reminds me of the Dreamcast, it was a decent system but lauched to early and was gobbled up a year later buy its big bad compeditor Sony. but it did have a good run back in 1998...

    *sigh*
    1998 really was a good year.
     
  7. Kibbles-N-Bits

    Kibbles-N-Bits New Member

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    Alienware for users with little time to build their own and deep pockets. :)
     
  8. kanegs

    kanegs New Member

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    Check out: http://www.dansdata.com/io004.htm
    You still think Dell is a good idea?
     
  9. TheShiningWizard

    TheShiningWizard Because it's more fantastical.

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    Whenever I order components for a system, I always get them all from one company (usually NewEgg, but sometimes TigerDirect). I'm willing to pay another 40 dollars total if it means I'll be working with a reputable company with a seamless return/servicing process. NewEgg let me return a mouse because I decided that I didn't like the color :)
     
  10. {Ghetto_Ghepetto}

    {Ghetto_Ghepetto} I am #1 Asian big boob queen!

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    I suggest you get your parents a fully assembled machine from www.ibuypower.com . There you can pick your own parts (much like Dell, but with a better selection) such as case, mobo, video card, etc. and the prices are less than Dell's. At least the last time I checked Dell's prices were too much for me when I was looking for a computer about 5 months ago and I was really considering ibuypower. I actually configured a great computer for under $800 a few months ago. Check it out, you might find something you like or your parents might like, if they care at all.

    Edit: I actually just configured a great comp on ibuypower for $700! WITH Win XP home. Anyways check it out once again. I don't think you will find a price like that on Dell.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2003
  11. Thrash123

    Thrash123 Obey Leash Laws

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    One thing about ibuypower - I discovered than in the machine I ordered for my mom through their that they GLUED components in! Dell's machines have VERY nice cases, and expansion cards are toolless to remove/insert thanks to it's design. Means less damage done by slipped screws
     
  12. spm1138

    spm1138 Irony Is

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    How good is Dell's tech support for home (as opposed to business) users? Are they as ready to send you a new part no questions asked if you don't represent a nice slice of business for them?

    The small stuff is not to be underestimated. Decent cabling (I like those dinky round cables. Much easier than ribbons when you've got a big case full of drives) and cases (Antec/Chieftec at the very least) will make your life vastly more pleasant in the long run if you ever have to open the case. Think of the skinned knuckles you'll be saving yourself.

    I always end up spending more on my homebrews than the equivalent shop-bought because I generally spend towards the high end of the spectrum in any given category on the basis that you get what you pay for.

    Spend more now, spend less later in replacing ****ty parts that wear out. Quality name brand stuff generally seems to be more compatible (I love my Plextor because it works with anything. NeXT, Irix, old MacOS etc. etc.) and better supported with drivers than the no-name stuff.
     
    Last edited: Oct 18, 2003
  13. TheShiningWizard

    TheShiningWizard Because it's more fantastical.

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    In a word, "no."
    In a bigger word, "nope."
     
  14. Philophobos

    Philophobos New Member

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    Thanks for all of the advice and warnings Ghep and others, but I am afraid that I have already committed the unpardonable sin of buying an e-machine.

    It has an AMD 2800+ XP, 512 DDR RAM 333, Geforce4 MX (more than my parents will ever need), DVD drive, CD-RW drive, 120 GB hard drive. It also came with a 15" LCD flat panel monitor, a multi-function printer, and XP Home, all for under $1000. It is more than triple the computer they had before, which when they bought it cost them ~$2300.

    What is so bad about e-machines? I mean, I would never buy one for myself, but I was under the impression that they are decent for joe computer-illiterate.

    EDIT: Somehow listed a Geforce 2 instead of a Geforce 4.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 18, 2003
  15. Thrash123

    Thrash123 Obey Leash Laws

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    I have never encountered a problem with an e-Machine, and I have upgraded 3, from budget to higher end ones. Not really enough to judge them, IMHO, but good enough to give a thumbs up on the purchase. Hope it works out.
     
  16. Derelan

    Derelan Tracer Bullet

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    Doesn't that question answer itself? No, never, not unless you show them a warranty.
     
  17. spm1138

    spm1138 Irony Is

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    Not really.

    Do they send you a replacement part in exchange for the old or do they ask you to send them the original part for "testing" for a couple of weeks?

    Is the arrangement such that in practice it's better to buy a new component and put the possible replacement part in your spares box?

    Do they do onsite or is it all RTB?
     

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