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UE3 - UT3 Anyone here ever heard of Digipen?

Discussion in 'Modeling & Skinning' started by BobTheBeheader, Mar 19, 2008.

  1. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Sorry, this isn't directly related to modeling, but I don't feel like this is a good OT thread, and I don't know where else to put it on BUF where people who know alot about modeling and animation will see it.

    I'm going to a 4 year university right now, with a computer science major, but it's not what I really want to be doing. I'm thinking that when I graduate I might want to go to a school that can teach me some animation for games so I can get a job as an animator.

    Digipen seems to be pretty close to home for me, and I'm going to check it out on this Friday.

    Does anyone here know anything about the place? I've heard some good stuff about it, but I've also heard schools like this can be a bit of a mixed blessing.
     
  2. Phopojijo

    Phopojijo A Loose Screw

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    Digipen from the people I hear -- is good.

    What you need to worry about is not so much game design universities... as much as you need to worry about -- like -- game design trade schools.

    As for animation -- you probably would be just as good teaching yourself that.

    Digipen isn't cheap. I'm paying like -- a third of what someone in Digipen is... and I'm getting a 4-year Physics degree.

    Yes -- Digipen is great and doesn't fall into the "we take your money but don't teach you what you need" stereotype of most Game Design schools -- but is it great for you?

    Particularly since Animation is something that you could just as easily (and in probably less time and DEFINITELY cheaper) teach yourself.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2008
  3. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Yeah. I'm not too sure it's right for me, but I don't think I can land a game animation job without it. Everyone talks about how hard it is to break in since they look for people with experience.
     
  4. Angel_Mapper

    Angel_Mapper Goooooooats

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    Getting a job is more about the people you know, another reason I recommend being very active in the community you're seeking.
     
  5. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Yay I posted the same thread in two sub-forums and now I'm totally lost. :)

    Thanks.
     
  6. InAction

    InAction I make things move

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    Then may I be the first to break the bubble for you. I had animated TWO sequences and someone saw me on a forum and asked me if I were interested in a job. A month later I started working as the sole animator in a game development studio. Observe that I have absolutely NO education in the matter, I'm completely self taught and it was my knowledge that let me in.

    So don't let your hopes go down, it's not as hard as you think. Most of the time the smaller studios just don't know how to reach you. For example in my case; if I hadn't posted my animations for critique on the forum that day, I wouldn't be working and be where I am right now. :)
     
  7. Cryosis

    Cryosis New Member

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    Angel_Mapper is correct, the best thing you could get out of digipen is contacts via a project you worked on. Getting in through just a portfolio with an intern or junior position will get you farther in the span it would take you to go through schooling in the games industry. It all boils down to how adamant you are about what you want to do, if you feel like you can't motivate yourself without school.. go to school. If you can go home roughly every day and get to work on a mod with a bunch of people or a level or whatever, then go for it. If you know someone to where your applying to that can help you tremendously
     
  8. Dooley

    Dooley New Member

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    I attended a game design school that did fall in the 'take money don't teach' category. I didn't care as I was lead designer on the project and the project went relatively well.
    Remember that these places are businesses. They exist to make profit and reputation.
    You can gain contacts and critique in the school, but you can get that by setting up a basic webpage and just showing your work CONSTANTLY in various forums.
    The industry isn't looking for the MOST talented people, they are looking for the most EFFICIENT people.

    Game design and development takes long hours but it's even longer if you're dealing with slow artists.
    The trick about experience is knowing how to deliver that walk cycle, or jump with weight within a few hours, not two or three of polish and tween.

    So what I'm saying is keep a website, and post to as many animation forums as you can, as often as you can. Keep updating and when you feel you have some really nice clips in your portfolio, make a reel and start peppering the studios with email, "Hey check me out! Hey look at my reel! Hey, download my reel here!"

    Insofar as 'experience' goes, if the studios see that you can crank off a bunch of rough character cycles inside of an hour, that's Great! If they see you can deliver several complete and polished animations inside of a day, that's Fantastic!

    This will be the fastest way to ensure your position with the industry.

    The real reason most folks go to 'school' of this sort is to be around like minded people, and to get motivated. If you can motivate yourself, you're well on your way.
    Professional animators are always readily available to critique your work online.
    Give it a shot.
     
  9. fleshsniper1

    fleshsniper1 New Member

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    Going to a university for training is good. I dont think theres really a crappy university, more so its really up to the individual who have the talent and resource, you can go the crappiest university and still be very successful. Its all about extending your possibility of being notice. To be notice with just self taught, thats just luck that someone will stumble upon you, if your really passionate about it dont take the chance of that happening.
     
  10. Brucek

    Brucek New Member

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    It's like everything in life, having the degree helps, but only in areas that you HAVE to have one.

    People don't care if you can write bad papers to get class credits, the care about talent and they trust the people they trust!!!

    That is why word of mouth is so important and why choosing a college in the city you want to work in is key to landing the dream job you want.

    You may need to find the firm you want to work for and then move to that city for grad school.

    All the best!
     
  11. Jonathan

    Jonathan New Member

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    Last edited: Apr 11, 2008
  12. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Thanks, I'll check those out.
     
  13. EvilS4

    EvilS4 New Member

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    These types of schools are good for building a portfolio but do not guarantee a job. The BA shows you have staying power and looks good on a resume. Unless you are a superstar.

    I would check out FORCE by Mike Mattesi for more animation stuff. Very good book.
     
  14. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Thanks.

    My portfolio is the major issue here. Basically I don't have the time right now to build a great portfolio, and this would be a good opportunity to do just that.
     
  15. BobTheBeheader

    BobTheBeheader New Member

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    Thanks.

    My portfolio is the major issue here. Basically I don't have the time right now to build a great portfolio, and this would be a good opportunity to do just that.
     
  16. Jonathan

    Jonathan New Member

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    I had the $ on hand right now, I'd head up to VFS in Canada to start school there.

    Were I an animator, I'd sign up for Animation Mentor.

    VFS doesn't make you an artist, but it puts you in an environment where you push yourself and work among your peers to get better. :)

    Check out Animation Mentor's website, they're going to have a live web-based video segment on animation and the industry. It's free, and all you have to do is sign up. :) The last one was great, and was with the co-founder of AM, who is currently an animtor at ILM. :)
     
  17. EvilS4

    EvilS4 New Member

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    Portfolio speaks much louder than anything. Next comes contacts and referrals.

    I cant stress a good portfolio enough and one that is updated. I know how hard it can be to self motivate when nothing in the distance is clear in sight. Start slow and ramp yourself up, create new goals for yourself. When those goals are reached, step up to the next level.

    Also, keep this in mind. No school is going to make anyone an amazing animator, artist, modeler, etc... that is up to the student going. You get out what you put into the program.
     
  18. |*BILLY$CLINT*|

    |*BILLY$CLINT*| I make things happen!

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    I have heard that Digipen is where you go if you want to make Nintendo games. What ever you do don't go to Collins College I made the mistake of going there and while I do have a job in the game industry Collins College did not help me out getting that job. BUF and the UDN helped me to land that job :) Finally its all about what you put in. I worked my ass off in school and that is why I got to where I am at today. If you put the bare minimum in that is what you will get in return and no one in games looks for just the bare minimum.

    You have to make the time Bob if this is that important to you then you will find that time.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2008
  19. ambershee

    ambershee Nimbusfish Rawks

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    Employers can tell right away if your portfolio is just a pile of what you cobbled together whilst at college. They don't want to see that.

    They want to see work that you did, because you enjoyed doing it.

    Going to a college with a supposedly brutal, condensed schedule is only going to hurt you're ability to do some outside learning, and building that portfolio of personal work.
     
  20. Jonathan

    Jonathan New Member

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    I'll be sending a portfolio off to a small game studio probably today. Keeping my fingers crossed. :)

    I also got a frontpage plug at SimplyCG for my Hulk WIP, hehehe. :D
     

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