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patrickrho
27th Jan 2004, 10:46 PM
Ok heres the problem
I have been following 3d buzz's Unreal Technology vtms and I figured, hmm How bout trying to do this in Runtime?

so I am done with BSP brush settings and now I have to do static meshes. I export them from Unreal Engine 3.0 that is supplied with UT2003 and then import back in in Runtime

It imports fine, with proper textures, but for example, when I export BastienHardware package's ramp_02 and then import it and try to play the map, it requires you to have xEffects package.

I have no idea why it is asking for me that package...All i did was just importing the static mesh...

Can anyone help me? thank you

[SAS]Solid Snake
28th Jan 2004, 08:10 AM
First of all, what you are doing here is illegal if you decide to distribute this, distribution of other people's work isn't appreciated especially when you are doing it like this.

Static meshes are allowed to have links to other packages outside their own for certain things and probably in this case to a skin/texture. Thus a skin/texture exists in xEffects that is being used by the static mesh... hence the reason why it is requesting for it.

scumble
28th Jan 2004, 11:29 AM
More to the point, why bother with Runtime? Just use UT2003 if you're going to do that.

patrickrho
28th Jan 2004, 03:02 PM
@scumble: i was just curious..heh..

hmmphz
LOL! I'm not gonna distribute this tutorial thingee lolz
I'm just curiuos about UnrealEngine Runtime and what it can achieve and figure out the differnce between UT2003 and RT..so that i could actually go about looking at various tutorials and make my project for my school

ok theres a folder called xEffects in UT2003, cuz I extracted the source files from the .u files and its all source code files..where can I find the textures? is it in the xEffects.u?????

[SAS]Solid Snake
29th Jan 2004, 12:34 AM
There are a few textures in xEffects.U, although I'm not going to really say how to extract them.

The difference between UT2003 and RT is minimal. The main difference between the two is that UT2003 has a lot of code base lying underneath thus it is very quick to say write a mod for UT2003, since a lot of the code already exists, such as code that handles weapons, pickups, inventory, gameplay, bot AI and so forth.

RT is the Unreal engine as is, as it only comes with a few example maps and the core script classes such as Actor, Pawn and so forth. However you need to par take a lot of work on your side to get a project in that.

Mapping and other physical differences are vitually non-existent as the Unreal engine versions between the two don't differ by a lot (Comparing say UT99 - UE2, would be that there is a large difference).

scumble
29th Jan 2004, 06:31 AM
The fact that Runtime has a lot less "junk" in it seems very convenient for studying the basic features of the engine, and testing new ideas without the confusion of a lot of other classes.

patrickrho
29th Jan 2004, 07:12 AM
oh ok thanx for your help guys!

[SAS]Solid Snake
29th Jan 2004, 07:13 AM
The fact that Runtime has a lot less "junk" in it seems very convenient for studying the basic features of the engine, and testing new ideas without the confusion of a lot of other classes.

No, it doesn't have junk. How can you learn from nothing? You'll end up being very very frustrated because of the lack of examples. Most good coders here started by learning the base code of working titles to see how things *click* together. For example, there are loads of replication examples strewn all over UT2003, while UE2 may have very little or none at all. Replication understanding is one of the hardest areas to understand, and if you have to learn from the small amount that UE2 offers then you'll find it very difficult.

I always suggest to people when they start with UnrealScript is to learn what this script does, what does ShieldGun do exactly, and how does it do it? That is a far better learning environment.

UE2 is there for experienced people. Because you have to make a lot of base code or underlying code it can prove to be difficult, especially if you want some simply things to be setup. For example if you wanted a working weapon system going in UE2 you have to write it all yourself, whereas with UT2003 you can simply base it off xWeapon or Weapon.

oneirotekt
29th Jan 2004, 10:39 AM
Solid Snake']For example, there are loads of replication examples strewn all over UT2003, while UE2 may have very little or none at all. Replication understanding is one of the hardest areas to understand, and if you have to learn from the small amount that UE2 offers then you'll find it very difficult.

I always suggest to people when they start with UnrealScript is to learn what this script does, what does ShieldGun do exactly, and how does it do it? That is a far better learning environment.

Unfortunately, sometimes this can also be very confusing. Some of the script code in UT2003 is very convoluted and irritating, and makes a poor example for someone who's learning how to code!

Solid Snake']UE2 is there for experienced people.

This I would definitely agree with though. I guess ideally someone in the community (alas, I'm busy with my own project :D) could make some examples, maybe just with placeholder art content, that demonstrate simple means of implementing skeletal characters, inventory, HUDs etc. Just a little extra tutorial content woudl go a long way towards making the runtime a fantastic learning tool for beginners and advanced alike.

Swooping in with only the slightest provocation and giving people a dire warning that doing something remotely game-like is ILLEGAL ILLEGAL ILLEGAL is not very helpful though. I'd rather give people the benefit of the doubt; if they end up distributing a game in a way that annoys Epic then the matter will be resolved anyway.