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View Full Version : [california] Could recall election change politics in America?


Clayeth
8th Aug 2003, 12:42 PM
I was thinking about this as I was watching an interview with Oregon's Governmor, talking about how all of this is wrong, and that the people running for governor are a joke. But, if someone like Arnold wins, and is successful: could this allow the political climate of the entire country to change? Allowing a move away from career politicians and such a stronghold by the two parties?

This is the only major election I've ever seen where people who aren't one of the top two supported members of each party even stands a chance, or has a real opportunity to win, and there is a real varity of candidates.

So, could this have an effect on politics across the rest of the country? Not by people calling recalls (if they even can), but by drawing more alternatives into elections, and having them taken more seriously.

W0RF
8th Aug 2003, 01:09 PM
Not many states allow recalls, but most have some form of restitution or another, usually impeachment.

I think the success of Arnold's term would mean more to the political outlook than his election unto itself. Of course, with Cali being tens of billions in debt and having a fiscal conservative-slash-social liberal in office, he stands a good chance of putting that state back on its feet without alienating the voters.

KJAX
8th Aug 2003, 04:51 PM
Yes because California is one of the most progressive states in our union. I live in the Midwest (Missouri to be precise) and cultural trends tend to move from the coasts to the middle of the country...even political trends.

As Bill Maher put it, we have become a feminized nation due in large part to the progressive feminist (or women's) movement that started, I believe, on the west coast. California has a deep history of setting trends here in the U.S. This recall election is sure to do the same.

AriTheDog
8th Aug 2003, 05:26 PM
Vote Arnold. Or else he'll have to say "I'll be back" when he loses.

Fomhoire
8th Aug 2003, 06:11 PM
Not many states allow recalls, but most have some form of restitution or another, usually impeachment.

California, along with 17 other states allow for recalls.

I hope this recall sends the message that politicians can be held accountable for their negligence, and they aren't 'above' everything like they think they are.

Will it start recalls in other states? This is what politicians fear the most. I don't think there will be a wave of gubernatorial recalls across the country. More likely we will see municipal and county recalls bouncing a few mayors and members of city councils, along with elected county officials.

The Dopefish
8th Aug 2003, 10:25 PM
Even if there is an impact on the state level, it will take a while for it to heavily impact the federal government. But, by then, GWB will likely have found a loophole that allows him to serve over two terms and we'll have had a revolution. :p

The biggest change that would have to be made is the requirements for becoming president. If there are more than two parties, then the pool of electoral votes becomes shallower, and getting the 2-hundred-something electoral votes to become president will become difficult, maybe even impossible.

The problem with the California recall and all similar recalls is that everyone and their brother/sister/mother/father is running. Imagine that on the presidential level and the problem becomes twofold. BTW, if you ever look at ballots from other counties in other states (read: as with the 2000 Election and all the press the ballots got), you might notice candidates you didn't see on your ballot and you may have had candidates on your ballot they didn't have. (Link (http://www.fec.gov/pages/2000geballot.htm))

an_old_man
8th Aug 2003, 10:56 PM
I was listening to the radio the other day; It was a hippie channel aka NPR, I don’t know what I was thinking… but, they were all for the right to recall, they just wanted it to be updated a bit. Even people on the left agree that a recall should be an option. :eek:

Waffnuffly
8th Aug 2003, 11:01 PM
Vote Arnold. Or else he'll have to say "I'll be back" when he loses.
That is a top-quality joke right there :tup:

I seriously hope that if he does win, he does a really good job to prove all these people who doubt him wrong, and to help bring about a new trend in politics. As we can see from our current state of affairs, politicians have a lousey reputation in general, so the people who could do a great job in political positions are too afraid to run, which results in all the crappy people getting into positions because they know they can. Hopefully this will change, and we'll have some more level-headed and iltelligent people geting into offices, rather than just the people who know the ropes and the way to get into office simply by poltical dexterity. Those who don't really care about doing the right thing.

Clayeth
9th Aug 2003, 01:20 PM
The problem with the California recall and all similar recalls is that everyone and their brother/sister/mother/father is running. Imagine that on the presidential level and the problem becomes twofold. BTW, if you ever look at ballots from other counties in other states (read: as with the 2000 Election and all the press the ballots got), you might notice candidates you didn't see on your ballot and you may have had candidates on your ballot they didn't have. (Link (http://www.fec.gov/pages/2000geballot.htm))
I really feel like there should be local elections for candidates. It could go through a series, instead of doing it by party, sort of like a highschool sports tournament: local, district, region... narrowing them down until you have a managable number of candidates. Not sure what that would be, something under 10 I'm sure by the time it reached the national election. Because I think the two parties are more busy trying to make each other look bad than trying to help the country. If each person was responsible for their own actions, even if they were just trying to further their career, they would have to do what the voters wanted, or they would easily be voted out since their party couldn't just keep pushing them out, and only having to compete against the opposing party's candidate.

Sam_The_Man
9th Aug 2003, 07:42 PM
I seriously hope that if he does win, he does a really good job to prove all these people who doubt him wrong, and to help bring about a new trend in politics. As we can see from our current state of affairs, politicians have a lousey reputation in general, so the people who could do a great job in political positions are too afraid to run, which results in all the crappy people getting into positions because they know they can. Hopefully this will change, and we'll have some more level-headed and iltelligent people geting into offices, rather than just the people who know the ropes and the way to get into office simply by poltical dexterity. Those who don't really care about doing the right thing.

I hate to burst your bubble, but Arnold Schwarzenegger is just an actor. Just because he isn't a politician doesn't make him a great leader - look at Ronald Reagan, although even he surely couldn't make California any more bankrupt at this moment.

Waffnuffly
9th Aug 2003, 10:41 PM
Don't worry, you aren't bursting my bubble... I understand that he is just an actor. But he's married to a Kennedy ffs, which is an EXTREMELY political family. Also, I mentioned that I HOPE he does a good job.. I never said he will. I just hope he does.. it would be nice to see some changes on the way politics work.

W0RF
11th Aug 2003, 09:13 AM
I hate to burst your bubble, but Arnold Schwarzenegger is just an actor. Just because he isn't a politician doesn't make him a great leader - look at Ronald Reagan, although even he surely couldn't make California any more bankrupt at this moment.
Is he "just an actor"? Is Bill Frist "just" a heart surgeon? Aren't most of the congress "just" lawyers (which perfectly qualifies them for bloodsucking on a federal level)?

Personally I'd be more interested in hearing Arnold's actual views on issues (rather than "children need books") before determining whether he actually has any political savvy. But being an actor doesn't make him not a politician. Were you American, I would consider that a dangerous position to take, since our government is supposed to be elected representative citizens. I say supposed not out of sarcasm or patronization, but because our leaders on the local level may be regular citizens, but on the federal level we are overrun by career politicians who spend all their time catering to special interests and trying to get re-re-re-re-re-elected.

The people who are "just" an actor in my estimation are guys like Martin Sheen, who thinks playing the President on TV somehow makes him a qualified politicial commentator. By the way, Barbara Streisand and Alec Baldwin, you said if Bush won you were going to Canada. We're still waiting. And take your brothers with you, Alec.

Clayeth
11th Aug 2003, 09:36 AM
The only thing I've heard from him on issues so far is that he wants to help bring more companies into California. Something about changing the workman's compensation system to be less of a strain on the companies.

W0RF
11th Aug 2003, 09:42 AM
That actually is something that needs to be done. Part of Cali's huge deficit is due to business pouring out of the state.

DRT-Maverick
11th Aug 2003, 11:26 AM
Yes because California is one of the most progressive states in our union. I live in the Midwest (Missouri to be precise) and cultural trends tend to move from the coasts to the middle of the country...even political trends.

As Bill Maher put it, we have become a feminized nation due in large part to the progressive feminist (or women's) movement that started, I believe, on the west coast. California has a deep history of setting trends here in the U.S. This recall election is sure to do the same.

I live on the boarder of Cali and Nevada. The only trends I ever see from cali are driving and clothing, not really politics, maybe it bypasses the state of gambling and whores :p

It'll only change in the community of Cali.

IntRed
11th Aug 2003, 12:06 PM
I wouldn't underestimate him either, from what I can see he seems like a man who does his research (or someone else does it for him quite possible). The fact is that he's done numerous amounts of decent things already (politically speaking)